November 25, 2010

Happy Thanksgiving!

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32 comments:

  1. At 160, you should remove the boyd and let it carry over cook.

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  2. Why are you standing on your turkey thermometer?

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  3. I think it's a perfectly respectable thermometer.

    Why must you refer to it that way?

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  4. ... the turkey adj. is not pejorative, but it's a good thing that it's a thermometer. Let's just say that those toes would seem to belie a 115 lb. body.

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  5. This is the most confusing string of comments I've seen on O Dock, and I am no stranger to confusion.

    Wordless blog posts are like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're going to get.

    (Well that, and you give them when you have nothing else handy.)

    Maybe I'm confused by all of the tryptophan and carbohydrates, but it could be the wine, too.

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  6. yeah, it's probably the wine...

    purple haze

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  7. Jimi Hendrix languished in relative obscurity for years and would probably remain there today had he not been discovered by an enterprising and dedicated English manager and producer called Chas Chandler and then brought to the world's attention by a famous mondegreen.

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  8. Once again, Tillerman, its clear You Are Experienced. Scuse me while I kiss this guy.

    Baydog has a few of his own great mondegreens, which I am sure he'll be happy to share.

    As for Chas... whattabass

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  9. That bass riff is about the one thing I learned to play really well on the guitar. And that song! If you were 16/17 in 1965 and lived where I did, it said it all.

    RIP Chas Chandler.

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  10. The one mondegreen I will never be able to get out of my perverse ear is Manfred Mann's classic about a number runner in the night who, for some reason, was dressed up in a very peculiar way.

    Of course, mondegreens would have languished in relative obscurity if they hadn't been brought to the world's attention by a dedicated San Francisco writer.

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  11. I'm with you on that one...

    "wrapped up like a douche..." ??

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  12. Some posts languish in relative obscurity while others are discovered by enterprising and dedicated readers....This one seems to have found a second wind.

    And all these years I thought Jimi Hendrix was gay!

    What IS the pompetous of love anyway?

    WV: mapeeth. Mike Tyson said: Don't come any closer; mapeeth is in my front pocket!

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  13. I don't care how tall you are, you need to lose many kilograms. ;^)

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  14. What was the weight of the camera?

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  15. don't ask don't tell11/28/10, 1:37 PM

    Charles R. Cross's 2005 biography of Jimi Hendrix references Army medical documents that show that Hendrix actually declared himself to have homosexual tendencies.

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  16. In the army examination rooms and draft boards of the '60s, many were given to sudden admissions of all sorts.

    Not that there was anything wrong with that.

    Some escaped to Canada. Some escaped in a purple haze. Some escaped to the pompatus of love.


    If I've said it once, I'll say it twice.

    This is the most confusing string of comments I've seen on O Dock, and I am no stranger to confusion.

    I'm still blaming it on the tryptophan.

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  17. O Docker, my friend, I am sympathetic to your hopes of maintaining order (with respect to a chosen thematic thread of discourse), but may I remind you of the comment you posted on Baydog's post One Thousand Words, in answer to my fruitless (don't ask, don't tell) attempt to understand it all...

    "K, you're trying to make sense out of something I said by applying logic?

    I always crumble in the face of logic." --O Docker

    OCTOBER 30, 2010 10:38 AM

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  18. Ivan Turgenev11/28/10, 7:47 PM

    Nature cares nothing for logic, our human logic: she has her own, which we do not recognize and do not acknowledge until we are crushed under its wheel.

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  19. When we were little, we put pennies on the railroad track and waited for the train while smoking Newports that we bought "for our mom" from the cigarette machine at the Acme for 50 cents.

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  20. Ivan, thanks for stopping by O Dock. I will never forgive you for making me suffer through that novel of yours in high school, but at least you've returned this thread back to the original post.

    Every Thanksgiving, I suffer from the crushing weight of a meal I thought it was perfectly logical to eat.

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  21. A quarter mile Northeast past Noble station on the West Trenton Line.

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  22. Baydog, I did my penny crushing about five miles away, on the Chestnut Hill line.

    But you raise an interesting point. What is it about penny crushing that 10-year-old boys find so fascinating?

    Or is it found so fascinating? I wonder if today's video-gaming, quick-texting 10-year-olds still crush pennies on railroad tracks.

    And I say 10-year-old boys because this was something that 10-year-old girls never did, to my knowledge. I wonder if sociologists have noted the passing of this male rite of passage.

    And was this strictly an American phenomenon? Did English kids crush pence on railroad tracks?

    There must be a blog post here somewhere.

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  23. Amazing to me that you knew I was 10 at the time. Girls? Oh yeah girls. Don't know what they were doing. Didn't care yet.

    Kids these days have little use for pennies; it's not like you can buy a piece of gum or something.

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  24. Girls certainly did put pennies on railway tracks. Snopes.com in an article debunking the myth that the penny could derail the train, report on two separate incidents where girls were killed while putting pennies on the rails.

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  25. As for whether any 10-year-old English boys ever put pennies on tracks, I don't know. But I can say that at that age, although I and my compatriots were fascinated by trains and would spend many hours sitting by the tracks train-spotting, we never once thought of putting pennies on the tracks.

    This speaks either to an extreme lack of imagination or an amazing excess of common-sense in English 10-year-old boys. The former is the more likely explanation.

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  26. That should of course read "as to" not "as for". But why?

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  27. You do, of course, need to get out of the way. It seems to be a no-brainer but apparently it was not.

    Speaking of other stupid things done at younger ages: Never mix Chlorox bleach with crystal Drano
    in a small bathroom with the window and door closed.

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  28. When I was a boy my Mum would send me down to the store with 5 shillings and I would come back with 5 bags of potatoes, 2 loaves of bread, 3 bottles of milk, a box of tea and 6 eggs but you can't do that these days with all these stupid securtiy cameras.

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  29. The girls were out of the way of the train that was going to come down the track with the penny on. Trouble was that the train didn't know it was supposed to come down that track, and instead came down the track that the girls were standing on. Hardly their fault.

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  30. I still want to know the weight of the camera.

    And what gender are the feet?

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  31. That should be "security" not "securtiy" of course. That's what you get for cutting and pasting jokes from Facebook.

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  32. Weighty topics all.

    Baydog said "Never mix Chlorox bleach with crystal Drano"... a similar concoction is used in Japan by some people committing suicide. It sometimes also affects others in the same building.

    When I was kid my mother told me go play on the railroad tracks. (not really) I flattened pennies on the rails just south of Santa Barbara, CA.

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